Nov 272014
 

Posted here  on Google Groups support forum:

to whom can I complain about Google’s high handed behavior

I had a Blogger account a couple of years ago, before it was acquired by Google. I would like to take it down. It shows up in searches in competition with another blog I put up on my own website.

To delete the Blogger account now Google requires that all Google products be deleted, including apps that I paid for at the Play Store. I can live with deleting my g-mail account, which is free after all, but Google wants to rob me of my paid for goods.

Google has also blocked me from taking down individual posts, which it seems like would belong to me.

I never agreed to this, Google purchased Blogger with no notice to me and no agreement of mine that I recall giving. I did not read the user agreement when I signed up to Blogger but I doubt there was anything about my Play Store apps there.

Thing is, its Google. Whose job is it to make Google play by some fair set of rules? Is there a regulator?

Don’t get me wrong. For a giant soul-less corporation Google does relatively little evil. I’m perplexed and delighted by all the free stuff they give out. But that should not entitle them to be dickish.

Here is my last post on Blogger.

http://visiblecontents.blogspot.com/2014/11/go-away.html

 And then, funny things began to happen~~~~[expand title=”Read On” id=”readon”]

A few minutes later I got this e-mail

email from google

And I clicked on the “Another Topic” link and there is this

forum post from Matt Bariletti

Thing is, handy as it is to have translations into Spanish and Portuguese, it would have been better to see that other forum where this popular subject was being addressed. Alas, not to be found. In fact, my original post has disappeared. Click on the link at the top and it takes you to this page.

I could not find contact information for Matt Bariletti. So I replied to his e-mail to me as follows

Hi, Matt. Sorry you have to work on a holiday. Maybe you are a robot, so that would be OK.

I see that  the page was forwarded, but I do not see the other topic related to my question. You say its a popular topic, which I’m sure is so, but can you refer me to the place at which the similar question is discussed and maybe even answered?

But then I noticed that his email address was blogger+noreply@googleproductforums.com, so I don’t think he got it.

Matts google plus pageMatt is, of course, is on Google Plus, that kind of lame competitor of Facebook (which in my opinion is unbelievably lame). So I have included him as an acquaintance in my circles. He looks like a nice guy.

Heres his url  https://plus.google.com/115510091888744404525/posts

So, I’ll post him a link to this post and hope that he gets back to me. I’d really like to know where my question is addressed on the forum. And, I guess it would also be nice if Google would be less, I don’t know, slimy? Lowdown? Lets go with unhelpful.

 

Usually Google has more self confidence. The first site I open every day is Google News, its my morning paper. And they often post news items that reflect poorly on Google. Different algorithm for support forums, I guess.
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 Posted by at 5:34 pm
Nov 252014
 

Monkeys understand Justice and Equity – YouTube.

This is a pretty famous clip. It bears several viewings, the moment where monkey number two realizes it is being screwed removes, I think, any doubt that we are of  similar stock.

Here is the director’s cut with additional material from the scientist guy:

▶ Two Monkeys Were Paid Unequally: Excerpt from Frans de Waal’s TED Talk – YouTube.

And here is one about Rat Morality, which sounds like the name of a punk band

 Posted by at 9:08 pm
Nov 252014
 

I am dubious of the proposition that humans are all that rational. Here is a longish list of reasons for such doubt.

List of cognitive biases – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Here are some of my favorites

Availability cascade A self-reinforcing process in which a collective belief gains more and more plausibility through its increasing repetition in public discourse (or “repeat something long enough and it will become true”)

Bias blind spot The tendency to see oneself as less biased than other people, or to be able to identify more cognitive biases in others than in oneself.

Confirmation bias The tendency to search for, interpret, focus on and remember information in a way that confirms one’s preconceptions.

Conservatism (Bayesian) The tendency to revise one’s belief insufficiently when presented with new evidence

Endowment effect The fact that people often demand much more to give up an object than they would be willing to pay to acquire it.

IKEA effect The tendency for people to place a disproportionately high value on objects that they partially assembled themselves, such as furniture from IKEA, regardless of the quality of the end result.

Information bias The tendency to seek information even when it cannot affect action.

Dunning–Kruger effect An effect in which incompetent people fail to realise they are incompetent because they lack the skill to distinguish between competence and incompetence. Actual competence may weaken self-confidence, as competent individuals may falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding.

 Posted by at 7:57 pm
Nov 232014
 

20140507_200608This is Yoruk Ali Efe. We visited the house where he lived. Major figure in the Turkish War of Independence.  In this part of Turkey you see almost as many representations of Efe as of Ataturk, and one is rarely not in sight of  a picture or statue of Ataturk. They put up a statue of Efe in Aydin and there was unrest because it failed to show him with a mustache. They had to take it down and redo it. Little statues of him are sold in souvenir shops. This one was at the registration desk of the very posh hotel we stayed  at near Patara.

 Posted by at 10:34 pm

Set Up a Low-Tech, Whole-House Speaker System Through Existing Phone Lines

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Nov 162014
 

Set Up a Low-Tech, Whole-House Speaker System Through Existing Phone Lines

Set Up a Low-Tech, Whole-House Speaker System Through Existing Phone Lines.

This is a post that ran on Lifehacker, a few years ago to my immense satisfaction. The system works great. I added an Airport Express device that makes it all “wireless”, ie without having to physically connect the computer. Marion very correctly thinks that word “wireless” is a misnomer. Looking at a wireless speaker that needed to be plugged in, and referring to system as a whole, she said, “What do you mean wireless? Theres wires everywhere!” And so there are.

I rarely read comments, and don’t have them yet for this site, my theory being anyone who might see this has my cell number, but I that I noticed this about the comments on Lifehacker: the more technically informed the commenter, the less the setup, which is brain-dead simple in its operation, was understood. My favorite comment, “Get this guy a beer!!”

 Posted by at 11:13 pm